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Twitter users find out what their names mean in Urban Dictionary

Of course, your name can have historical or traditional meaning (mine “Gael” refers to “a Gaelic speaking inhabitant of Ireland, Scotland or the Isle of Man”). But there might be a definition hidden there. On Monday, Urban Dictionary started trending on Twitter as presumably annoyed netizens found they could look up their first names in the participatory slang dictionary.

It’s more than easy to get your definition. Just pull up UrbanDictionary.com and see if your name is listed. Oddly, many names are, with super specific definitions. Keep in mind, however, that these are crowdsourced entries, so they may contain spelling and grammar errors and often feature adult sexual or other content. Urban Dictionary is not your grandmother’s Merriam-Webster.

So if your name is Adam, you may have grown up knowing that your name belonged to the first biblical man, and that many people say your name may derive from Adama , the Hebrew word for earth or soil.

But on UrbanDictionary, things get a lot more specific. Adam can boast of being “a sweet, lovable guy who will make any girl feel special” or “a good kisser and nerd when it comes to video games”.

Is your name Stacie? Not to brag, but you are apparently “so beautiful, it can make (people) cry”.

Do you go through Brandi? UrbanDictionary says you are the “ funniest, baddest chick” who “loves it hard” and you are “drama free”.

There are several definitions for Brandi, like most UrbanDictionary names, so if you don’t like this one, keep scrolling until you get an acceptable one. It is not an exact science.

However, not everyone wants to hear your results. One Twitter user wrote: “Nobody cares what your name means in the urban dictionary.”

The viral challenge asks users to add a photo to their Instagram Story that matches a specific caption sticker.

Some of the most popular ones have been ‘favourite photo from this summer’ and ‘who are you in love with’.

Now, a new one is flooding Instagram called ‘show us your name in Urban Dictionary’, and it’s proving to be the most popular one yet.

Urban Dictionary Names Trend Takes Over Instagram

If you’ve been on Instagram recently, your Stories have no doubt been flooded with the Urban Dictionary Names challenge.

To take part in the new trend, users have to search their name on Urban Dictionary, an online dictionary for slang words and phrases.

Then, they have to screenshot it and upload it to their Instagram Story using a specific sticker that says ‘show us your name in Urban Dictionary’.

Urban Dictionary was founded in 1999 by someone called Aaron Peckham and contains definitions of every word, event, or phrase that is popular on the internet.

Social media users are looking up their own names on Urban Dictionary and are sharing the flattering (and not so flattering) results.

For those who have never ventured to the website before, Urban Dictionary is a crowdsourced glossary that was created in 1999 by Aaron Peckham. Although its original purpose was to explain slang words, its remit has greatly expanded over the course of 22 years, to the point where it now contains definitions on everything from video games to politics and, yes, human names.

Unlike your standard Merriam-Webster or Oxford English Dictionary, the definitions you find on the website are not meant to be taken too seriously and are often presented more like jokes. For instance, if you look up the divisive final season of Game of Thrones, you will not get an objective description of its plot. Instead, it will read: “The TV equivalent of ending a beautiful and magnificent symphony with a rendition of “All-Star” by Smash Mouth played on a Kazoo.”

These (often humorous) entries are submitted by random users and are then vetted by a team of volunteer editors. As such, they’re not always guaranteed to have perfect grammar or spelling, and they will often use NSFW language too.

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