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Boeing 777: the American regulator strengthens examinations on certain aircraft

The United States Air Force has requested an examination of the engine blades of certain Boeing 777s similar to the one that had an incident in Denver on Saturday February 20.

The pressure is growing a little more on the Boeing 777, in the eye of the storm since a spectacular air incident last week. Thus, on Tuesday, February 23, the American Aviation Constable (FAA) ordered Tuesday a thorough examination of the engine blades of models similar to the one which experienced the incident in question. The checks aim to detect any cracks, before the aircraft can possibly fly back up.

The FAA could, depending on the results and other elements of the investigation, impose more frequent inspections on these engines manufactured by Pratt & Withney, the organization said in a statement. FAA boss Steve Dickson said as early as Sunday that he had asked his team of aviation safety experts to issue an emergency airworthiness directive that would require immediate or in-depth inspections of Boeing 777 planes equipped with certain Pratt & engines. Whitney PW4000.

On Saturday, during take-off from Denver airport in the United States, a United Airlines aircraft  had seen its reactor catch fire and lose its fairing . As the Boeing rushed back to the runway, a shower of debris fell on a residential area of ​​the city. 

Examinations already strengthened in 2018

According to the initial findings of the investigation independently conducted by the US office in charge of transportation safety, the NTSB, the damage observed on the spot is consistent with “metal fatigue” of the fan blades of the engine manufactured by Pratt & Whitney.

Jimmy Curd

Jimmy Curd is a features editor at iPress USA, where He oversees The Broadsheet newsletter and edits the publication’s long-form storytelling, as well as its coverage of gender and business.

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